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How Grand Union Found a Home Outside of SoHo at the Walker

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David Gordon and Barbara Dilley performing in the shared lobby of the Walker Art Center and the Guthrie Theater, October 10, 1975. Walker Art Center Archives.

Choreographer, dancer, and writer Wendy Perron reflects on the Walker’s engagement with Grand Union (active 1970–76), the New York postmodern dance collective that emerged out of Yvonne Rainer’s dance company and Judson Dance Theater. Its members included Rainer, Trisha Brown, Steve Paxton, David Gordon, Douglas Dunn, Barbara Dilley, Nancy Lewis, and Lincoln Scott. In a narrative account, Perron discusses the group’s collaborative and improvisatory ethos through a study of two pivotal residences held at the Walker in 1971 and 1975.

Wendy Perron, “How Grand Union Found a Home Outside of SoHo at the Walker,” in Side by Side: Collaborative Artistic Practices in the United States, 1960s1980s, eds. Gwyneth Shanks and Allie Tepper, Vol. III of the Living Collections Catalogue (Minneapolis: Walker Art Center, 2020). https://walkerart.org/collections/publications/side-by-side/how-grand-union-found-a-home-outside-of-soho-at-the-walker

Grand Union was a fleeting phenomenon that emerged from New York’s SoHo arts community, which itself emerged from the Judson Dance Theater of the early 1960s. The group’s performances were entirely improvised. In 1970, when Yvonne Rainer was gradually withdrawing from her dance company as director, she left it undecided how they would proceed. Thus Grand Union was born—on wobbly legs. They tried to choreograph as a collective, but discovered they had absolutely no interest in rehearsing each other’s material. They wanted to continue performing together, but not to rehearse. The solution to this dilemma? Improvise.

It was rare for any performing group to commit to improvisation without any agreed-upon structures. But most of the Grand Union dancers had as a foundation their work with Rainer, specifically Continuous Project—Altered Daily.This is the piece that Rainer was working on when she started asking the dancers to bring in their own movement material. She also gave them options as to when to join certain actions, or not, and which costume accessories to don. In loosening the director-dancer hierarchy, she recognized the gifts of each of her five dancers. Eventually she felt it was a “moral imperative” to let go of her directorship and give them free reign to participate equally in the making of work. Yvonne Rainer, Feelings are Facts (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2006), 322. They also shared a sensibility that readily collapsed distinctions between high art (with influences from Merce Cunningham, John Cage, and Robert Rauschenberg) and popular art (dancing to songs by Harry Nilsson, Scott Joplin, or the Kinks).

But the group’s longtime members each had a vivid stage personality and a distinctive way of moving. They were stars of the downtown dance world. From 1970 to 1976, their performances veered between anarchy and harmony, euphoria and disarray. They worked together intuitively as an ensemble, yet they were each brilliant dance artists as individuals. Grand Union’s longtime members were Trisha Brown, Steve Paxton, David Gordon, Douglas Dunn, Barbara Dilley (previously Lloyd), and Nancy Lewis (previously Green).Early members who were part of the 1971 residency—Yvonne Rainer, Becky Arnold, and Lincoln Scott (aka Dong)—left after a year or two. Paxton, who had been with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company when it came to Walker in 1964, could not be there for the 1971 residency. The first four went on to develop long associations with the Walker Art Center.

From left: David Gordon, Steve Paxton, Nancy Lewis, Douglas Dunn, Barbara Dilley, and Trisha Brown, members of Grand Union performing at the Guthrie Theater as part of the Grand Union residency at the Walker Art Center, October 5, 1975. Walker Art Center Archives.

The Walker presented Grand Union at two pivotal times in its six-year lifespan: first, in May 1971, when the group was just beginning to define itself, and second, in October 1975, only months before disbanding. These two residencies had a strong impact on the Twin Cities arts community as well as on Grand Union itself. The first residency, with its extensive community involvement, laid the groundwork for the second, which included numerous educational activities and risk-taking performances. During the group’s 1975 performance at the Guthrie Theater, for example, Grand Union reached a peak that was exhilarating, uncanny, unexpectedly cogent, gloriously democratic, and totally entertaining: an eight-minute sequence that gave the illusion of emanating from a single choreographic mind. But let me go back. I will return to this sequence later.

Grand Union performing in the shared lobby of the Walker Art Center and the Guthrie Theater, May 1971. From left: Lincoln Scott (aka Dong), Barbara Dilley (reaching up), Nancy Lewis (reaching downward), Trisha Brown (crouching on beam), Douglas Dunn (crouching opposite her), and Becky Arnold. Photo: Tom Berthiaume. Walker Art Center Archives.

Grand Union in 1971

Although Rainer abdicated leadership in 1970, in 1971 she was still the most well-known member of Grand Union. So, when Suzanne Weil, the former maverick coordinator for performing arts at the Walker, invited the group in 1971, she thought she was inviting Yvonne Rainer and her dancers—or, as Rainer’s agent referred to them, “Yvonne Rainer and ‘The Grand Union.’” Weil gradually realized that Rainer had withdrawn as director and was now just one member of this leaderless group. Democracy—or, at times, anarchy—prevailed.

One of the aspects that intrigued Weil about Grand Union’s milieu was the web of interdisciplinary relationships between dancers and visual artists. Most had been active in Judson Dance Theater along with Rauschenberg, Robert Morris, and Alex Hay, creating a fertile cross-pollination. “They were sparking off of each other,” said Weil. “It was a very interesting, yeasty time.”Suzanne Weil in conversation with Philip Bither, Walker Art Center, June 13, 2001, https://walkerart.org/magazine/suzanne-weil-in-conversation. As she told Philip Bither, the Walker’s senior curator of performing arts, she was determined to bring them for the opening of the new Edward Larrabee Barnes-designed building, “because I knew they were breaking all the rules.”

How did Rainer’s name come up in the first place? Weil no doubt had her New York art spies. But Minnesotan Judith Brin Ingber was also in the know. She served on the Walker’s Dance Committee for the Performing Arts, which made recommendations to the curator. While still a student at Sarah Lawrence College in the 1960s, Ingber would travel into New York City to see her classmate Meredith Monk and teacher Judith Dunn perform at Judson Memorial Church. During these trips into the city, she also saw Rainer and suggested her to Weil as an artist to invite to the Walker.Ingber, interview with the author, Dec. 2, 2016.

While in New York in 1970, Weil met with Rainer, Gordon (and perhaps Trisha Brown) in Rainer’s SoHo loft to discuss the residency. She still speaks with awe about the list of objects they requested.

I would sit there with a clipboard and Yvonne would say, “I need a hundred red rubber balls,” and I would say “OK.” And David would say, “I need 14 old men’s raincoats,” and I would say, “OK.” [The requests also included two motorcycles, one raft, 20 kites, six jump ropes, six black umbrellas, and one bicycle.] They thought, “Who is this woman; how’s she gonna do this stuff?” And I did; I killed myself.Suzanne Weil in conversation with Philip Bither, June 13, 2001.

Wanted ad produced for Grand Union’s residency at the Walker Art Center, 1971. Walker Art Center Archives.

This was the first engagement outside of New York City that sent Grand Union looking for performers from the community. In the Twin Cities, volunteers—dancers and non-dancers alike—signed up to participate in various pieces made by Grand Union members, rehearsed on May 25 and 26, 1971. For the big day of community performances, held on May 27, a document in the Walker archives outlines the “Dawn to Ten” scheduling. It includes “Tree” by the pond in Loring Park, a “motorcycle duet” in Loring Park, “Sleep Walking” in the Walker auditorium, “Kites” in Armory Gardens, “Meetings” in the horseshoe pit, a lecture-demonstration at 8 pm in the Walker/Guthrie concourse and lobby area, and a “new piece” at 10 pm in Loring Park. “Sleep Walking,” for instance, was a sketch of David Gordon’s that involved people slouching against walls. (It was for this that he needed the raincoats.) Weil remembers that “the program started at dawn … with a romp that Barbara performed with her group and ended with a piece of Becky’s at midnight in Loring Park on bicycles with umbrellas.”Anne Livet, ed., Contemporary Dance: An Anthology of Lectures, Interviews and Essays with Many of the Most Important Contemporary American Choreographers, Scholars and Critics (New York: Abbeville Press, in association with Fort Worth Art Museum, 1978), 235.

1971 Rehearsal & Performance Schedule

Journalist Irene Parsons, a self-described conservative housewife, embedded herself among the seventy or so volunteers. During this “diverse cultural event,” she reported, “there were concerts, lectures, demonstrations, films and a few happenings not easy to describe.” She did, however, find her fellow volunteers easy to describe:

They wore everything from leotards to granny skirts to African burnooses; knee boots to bare feet, bushels of hair on head and chin, jeans in states of extreme disrepair. Some alternately nursed babies or swung them casually from a sling. And they were friendly and open and warmly tolerant of a motherly type in polyester slacks.Irene Parsons, Jun. 9, 1971.

In addition to these community events, Grand Union presented a lecture-demonstration in which, according to writer Scott Bartell, dancers drifted around the stage talking to each other. At certain moments the audience was invited onto the stage. (Apparently a three-year-old felt comfortable romping around.)Elizabeth Garren, email message to author, Jan. 22, 2018. Bartell described a near confrontation that led to a breakthrough in audience understanding:

People had expectations about the dancing that weren’t being met—“Why don’t you all do something together?” one woman asked; “When are you going to begin?” asked another—and the performers became a little defensive. “This is what we do; we’re doing it already!” Yvonne Rainer replied.

Gradually, as they began to talk less and move more, the desires of the audience members and performers came closer together and the distinctions between them melted under the warmth of enjoying what was actually happening.

The audience was willing, it seemed, to allow their preconceptions about art to be redefined.Scott Bartell, “Review,” Minnesota Daily, June 3, 1971.

That redefining gave people a lot to think about. At the same time, though, there was an element that was very uncomplicated about Grand Union’s work: pleasure. During the same lecture-demonstration, Gordon said to the audience, “If I can show you what a good time I’m having, that seems like a good way of giving you a good time, too.”Peter Altman, “Spectators, dance troupe collaborate,” Minneapolis Star, May 28, 1971. That strategy certainly worked for two future Trisha Brown dancers who were in the audience: Elizabeth Garren and Judith Ragir, both members of the Twin Cities’s premier modern dance troupe, the Nancy Hauser Dance Company. Garren said, “We were blown away.”Elizabeth Garren, email message to author, June 23, 2017. For Ragir, it was a “life changing experience.”Judith Ragir, interview with the author, July 17, 2017. She remembers that Grand Union rehearsed in the Hauser company’s studio in Minneapolis’s West Bank and ended up having a joint improvisation session with Hauser’s dancers. Ragir was struck by Rainer’s ability to be still for a long time. But what really caught her attention was the dancer’s sense of freedom. When watching the lobby performance, she remembers feeling a rush of adrenaline: “Trisha, Barbara Dilley, and maybe Yvonne, were holding hands skipping around the room to ‘You’ve Got a Friend,’ and my heart went out of my chest seeing those three women skipping around to Carole King.”Inspired by Grand Union, Ragir and Garren, along with Gail Turner (who later danced with Meredith Monk), formed an improvisational group called the Harry Martin Trio that performed in homes and other site-specific locations. Attuned to Cage’s notion of the permeability of art and life, they engaged in everyday tasks as well as fanciful actions. Writer and choreographer Linda Shapiro gave the trio a favorable review in Many Corners in 1973 or ’74. (And I met these two deliciously creative dancers when I began dancing with Trisha Brown in 1975.) In a conversation we held on January 30, 2018, Diana Drake remembered performing in a large outdoor piece by Gail Turner, clearly inspired by Grand Union, called The Rain. By tapping their legs, they made sounds to simulate light rain, a downpour, and a storm.

  • Lecture-demonstration by Grand Union in the Walker Art Center Auditorium, May 1971. From left: Douglas Dunn, Barbara Dilley, Lincoln Scott (aka Dong), Yvonne Rainer, Trisha Brown, and Nancy Lewis. Photo: Tom Berthiaume. Walker Art Center Archives.
  • Lecture-demonstration by Grand Union in the Walker Art Center Auditorium, May 1971. From left: Lincoln Scott (aka Dong), Yvonne Rainer, Barbara Dilley. Photo: Tom Berthiaume. Walker Art Center Archives.
  • Lecture-demonstration by Grand Union in the Walker Art Center Auditorium, May 1971. From left: Barbara Dilley and Trisha Brown. Photo: Tom Berthiaume. Walker Art Center Archives.
  • David Gordon performing as part of Grand Union’s lecture-demonstration in the Walker Art Center Auditorium, May 1971. Photo: Tom Berthiaume. Walker Art Center Archives.

A Home Away from New York

Ingber describes Grand Union’s 1971 performance in the Walker’s outer lobby:

I remember them constructing, with hammer and nails and wood, an amazing structure in the entrance to the museum, which at this point was a shared entrance between the Guthrie Theater to your right and the museum theater to your left. They had this common foyer and that’s where they built this incredible structure. The performance was them building this and hanging on it, under it, and over it. The audience was on a staircase that came down from the upper level of the Guthrie and would enter in the foyer. People were standing all around; they could have turned and walked into the museum or into the theater, but instead they were transfixed, watching.Ingber, interview, 2016; email to the author, Jan. 22, 2018.

Grand Union performing in the shared lobby of the Walker Art Center and the Guthrie Theater, May 1971. From left: Barbara Dilley, Trisha Brown, and Becky Arnold (seated), singing to Lincoln Scott (aka Dong). Photo: Tom Berthiaume. Walker Art Center Archives.
Grand Union performing in the shared lobby of the Walker Art Center and the Guthrie Theater, May 1971. From left: Douglas Dunn (standing astride the beams), Yvonne Rainer (walking), and Becky Arnold (stretching horizontally across a beam). Photo: Tom Berthiaume. Walker Art Center Archives.

Critic Mike Steele, although not entirely positive in his review, caught the wit and playfulness of the group: “The dancers chant and sing and laugh, while a hippopotamus sculpture stands serene in the middle of the floor (until it is tipped and a leg breaks off, prompting Miss Rainer to stick it down her front and play with it inside her blouse, which prompts Gordon to feign a German accent and demand to remove the lump surgically, which causes everyone to break up).”Mike Steele, “Grand Union Performs at Walker,” Minnesota Daily, May 29, 1971. Writer Peter Altman felt he was witnessing a cracking open of the possibilities to reveal a more human connection: “The sense of shared life was rare and delicious, and suggested powerfully that whether what the Union had been doing was “art” or “beautiful,” the group had forged relationships here that most dance companies in residencies scarcely imagine.”Altman.

These relationships allowed the group to create a community outside New York City. This was a contrast to the reception in other tour venues, where Grand Union was often met with indifference. Gordon recalls that, in city after city, the audiences thinned out during their performances. “We would just watch the audience disappear.”Group interview with the author and Douglas Dunn, David Gordon, Steve Paxton, and Yvonne Rainer, New York, NY, July 26, 2017. At the Walker, however, Grand Union found a home away from home. Instead of walking out, the audience welcomed them with open arms; they were part of the party.Diana Drake, who was a 17-year-old dance student at the time, remembers the whole week as “incredibly cool.”

Grand Union and community participants performing in the shared lobby of the Walker Art Center and Guthrie Theater, May 1971. Installed above the group is a work by Sam Gilliam, Carousel Merge (1971), which the Walker acquired the same year. Photo: Tom Berthiaume. Walker Art Center Archives.

Grand Unions Return: 1975

Grand Union’s 1975 residency at the Walker, which took place from October 5 to 10, held fewer site-specific events but more workshops than the group’s 1971 residency. The performance series included a show in the Guthrie Theater in the beginning of the week, one in the Walker lobby at the end of the week, a solo show by Nancy Lewis, and a lecture demonstration by Barbara Dilley. Audiences were not invited to perform. Instead, anyone could take workshops with Paxton, Dilley, Gordon, and Dunn (Brown left early, right after the Guthrie performance). Paxton led a three-day video workshop at Minneapolis College of Art and Design that generated video material to be used in the final performance in the lobby—a different form of community involvement.

1975 Performance Schedule & Program Notes

The Guthrie performance, on October 5, continued the group’s interest in including audience, although in less obvious ways than in 1971. For starters, Paxton asked the lighting person for certain gel colors—lavender, amber—during the performance, so viewers could witness the process of making the lighting “magic.” Later, Gordon and Dunn chatted during a mock TV game show routine, and actually pointed out (possibly fictitious) members of the audience—“the blond woman with glasses” and “the fellow about four rows back.” After this long and hilarious scene, Gordon gave the audience the power to end the evening. “Do you want that to be the end?” he asked them. A resounding “Noooo” came back. (It’s clear, however, from the negative reviews by Steele and critic Jon Bream, that surely some did want them to stop.)See Mike Steele, “Review,” Minneapolis Tribune, Oct. 7, 1975; and Jon Bream, “Six individuals build disappointing dance in loose collaboration,” Minneapolis Star, Oct. 10, 1975.

  • Trisha Brown and Douglas Dunn performing at the Guthrie Theater as part of the Grand Union residency at the Walker Art Center, October 5, 1975. Walker Art Center Archives.
  • Grand Union performing on the Guthrie Theater stage, October 5, 1975. Walker Art Center Archives.
  • Grand Union performing at the Guthrie Theater as part of the Grand Union residency at the Walker Art Center, October 5, 1975. From left: Trisha Brown, Douglas Dunn, David Gordon, and Nancy Lewis. Walker Art Center Archives.
  • David Gordon performing at the Guthrie Theater as part of the Grand Union residency at the Walker Art Center, October 5, 1975. Walker Art Center Archives.
  • Grand Union performing at the Guthrie Theater as part of the Grand Union residency at the Walker Art Center, October 5, 1975. From left: Trisha Brown, Barbara Dilley, David Gordon, and Steve Paxton. Walker Art Center Archives.
  • Grand Union performing at the Guthrie Theater as part of the Grand Union residency at the Walker Art Center, October 5, 1975. From Left: Steve Paxton, Nancy Lewis, Trisha Brown, and Douglas Dunn. Walker Art Center Archives.

Both the Guthrie and lobby performances were videotaped, which, from my point of view as someone writing a book on Grand Union, is pure gold. From these videos, I was able to see how Grand Union’s collective awareness informed everything they did; how their individual gifts complemented each other; how their restraint as performers bolstered—or tested—the audience’s patience (the Guthrie performance began with twenty minutes of Brown and Gordon slowly inching around the perimeter with occasional dash-throughs by Dunn wafting a silk sail); how they sustained parallel narratives (at times three couples engaged in three completely different tasks or fantasies); their brilliant use of props (sofa, suitcase, lamp, carpet, portable door, parasol, sticks, dollies, fabrics); and the confusing, sometimes disturbingly porous, line between private and public (the animosity between Gordon’s “character” and Dunn’s “character” could well have been rooted in real-life tensions). But most of all, I was able to absorb the legibility that elicited the audience’s giddy pleasure. The earlier disconnection gave way to connection, opaqueness gave way to accessibility.

Grand Union performing in the shared lobby of the Walker Art Center and the Guthrie Theater, October 10, 1975. From left: Steve Paxton, Douglas Dunn, David Gordon, and Nancy Lewis. Walker Art Center Archives.
Douglas Dunn and Barbara Dilley performing in the shared lobby of the Walker Art Center and the Guthrie Theater, October 10, 1975. Walker Art Center Archives.
Grand Union performing in the shared lobby of the Walker Art Center and the Guthrie Theater, October 10, 1975. From left: Steve Paxton, Nancy Lewis, and Douglas Dunn. Walker Art Center Archives.

The scene that seemed to soar, where a single idea sparked a plethora of variations, where inventiveness piled on top of inventiveness, where all players contributed equally, was the bowing sequence at the Guthrie. It all happened in one continuous flow of steadily building energy. Brown started it. In her clear-as-a-bell voice, she spoke into the microphone: “Why don’t we take a bow and then start from there?” This ignited an eight-minute sequence of rollicking exuberance, in which the audience was with them 100 percent.

At the moment Brown proposes bowing, Gordon’s arm is encircling her waist; as she bows, he is behind her, and that makes a doubling of the bow. The doubling idea ripples through the group. Paxton gestures to Dunn, who comes from behind him as he bows. When Lewis walks forward to curtsy prettily, Dilley gloms onto her from behind. Brown suggests, “prancing into it and out of it.” Gordon bounces gently in place, asking, “Like this?” In response, Brown backs up, then bursts forth, flinging her arms wide, galloping downstage toward the audience. Paxton asks for “bow music”; immediately a soundtrack of an insistent tape loop is heard, creating a crazed kind of momentum. (According to a hand-written letter from Paxton to Suzanne Weil after the residency, music by Terry Riley, John Cale, and Steve Reich was used).Letter from Steve Paxton to Suzanne Weil, Walker Art Center Archives. Dunn initiates the run-and-slide bow. Gordon shimmies his shoulders in a showgirl bow.

Grand Union performing the “bowing sequence” at the Guthrie Theater as part of the Grand Union residency at the Walker Art Center, October 5, 1975. Video: Ron McCoy for the Walker Art Center.

The concept of bowing seamlessly shifts into any action coming downstage and going back upstage. The game has changed and everyone watching catches on. Paxton pushes the sofa forward, with Brown and Gordon joining him. The three pull the sofa back upstage, just in time for Dunn to hop over it to come downstage for a pirouette. Brown slides forward on a sofa cushion as if sledding; Paxton kneels on his cushion in mock triumph. They run back upstage; they tip the sofa over and—surprise—Lewis rolls out of it toward downstage. Dilley climbs on the sofa, prompting the others to form a shifting sculpture for her to walk on toward the audience. She steps on upper backs and shoulders. Where will she step next? Gordon pulls over the couch and other props. Completing her mountainous trek downstage, Dilley somehow ends up upside down, very close to the audience. Wild applause and cheering for a mission accomplished.

They could have ended it right there, on a high—and the critics would have been happier, no doubt. Instead they slipped into a narrative of an unsettling argument between “father” and “son,” as played out by Gordon and Dunn. It was one of those knotty times when they both seemed to be airing long-held hostilities. But the whole group took it in stride and ended up on the sofa in a relaxed moment of togetherness. The small suitcase that had been used earlier—Dunn and Paxton had pulled a bolt of silk out of it; Dilley had somehow gotten stuffed into it—was on the sofa, and Brown tossed it out onto the floor. As the lights faded, Gordon asked Brown, “Why did you throw the suitcase over there?” Brown: “I wanted to be able to get out fast.”

And that’s what she did. The Guthrie show was her penultimate performance with Grand Union. She was getting serious about having her own company. I know because I joined that company a month later, in November 1975. And in November 1976, I made my first trip to Minneapolis to dance with the Trisha Brown Dance Company, sponsored by the Walker Art Center.

Grand Union performing at the Guthrie Theater as part of the Grand Union residency at the Walker Art Center, October 5, 1975. From left: Barbara Dilley, David Gordon and Douglas Dunn (standing), and Nancy Lewis and Steve Paxton (seated). Walker Art Center Archives.

Wendy Perron is a former dancer/choreographer, and remains a writer, teacher, and curator. She was the editor-in-chief of Dance Magazine from 2004–13, and is the author of Through the Eyes of a Dancer: Selected Writings. In 2017 she co-curated Radical Bodies: Anna Halprin, Simone Forti and Yvonne Rainer in California and New York, 19551972. Perron danced with Trisha Brown in the 1970s, is a former associate director of Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, and has choreographed more than 40 works for her own company in her 30-year career. Perron currently teaches at NYU Tisch School of the Arts and The Juilliard School, and is the editor-at-large for Dance Magazine. She is also the author of a new publication on Grand Union, forthcoming through Wesleyan University Press in the fall of 2020.